Domestication of wild grapevines is still active

Global viticulture has evolved following market trends, causing loss of cultivar diversity and traditional practices. In Montenegro, modern viticulture co-exists with a traditional viticulture that still maintains ancient practices and exploits local cultivars. As a result, this region provides a unique opportunity to explore processes increasing genetic diversity. This post reports the results of a study carried out to evaluate the diversity of Montenegrin grapevines and the processes involved in their diversification. Analyses of genetic structure unveiled several putative proto-varieties, likely representing the first steps involved in the generation of new cultivars or even secondary domestication events.

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Measuring Wine Industry Efficiency with Wine Industry Network Evaluation Model (WINE-Model)

In this post the authors propose a group of indicators for the analysis of wine industry performance. They present a new model that analyzes the direct impact of wine industry productivity rate (Π*), the wine industry performance rate (ΔΠ), the wine cargo expansion rate (Δϛ), and the wine industry technological change adaptability rate (ϕ) on wine industry network efficiency (WINE-Index). This new model, “The Wine Industry Network Evaluation Model (WINE-Model)” is intended to offer policy makers and researchers an additional analytical tool to study the impact of dynamic changes such as international trade trends and technological shocks on wine industry performance from a new perspective.
The WINE-Model can be applied to the study of any wine industry and is not constrained by geographical area or development stage of the industry. The WINE-Model is thus simple, flexible, and versatile. The authors appllied the model to the wine industries of Spain, Italy, France, Chile, Argentina, and Greece. Perhaps the WINE-Model’s biggest strength is its ability to capture and measure industry performance from a dynamic perspective.

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Impacts of global warming on southern California’s winegrape climate suitability

Southern California has seen a resurgence of winegrowing regions in the past few decades, however the future of winegrape climatic suitability in the area has not been exhaustively explored. This post reports the results of a study that evaluated the future climate suitability for the cultivation of winegrape and potential global warming impacts on southern California’s winegrowing regions through a series of high-resolution surface air temperature and precipitation projections obtained with the WRF-SSIB regional climate model.

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Different strategies in the vineyard planting to face global warming in viticulture

Different technological solutions are developing in the wine industry to mitigate the negative effects of the current global warming to mainly achieve wines with a lower alcohol content. These proposed solutions mostly act at the oenological level and are focused on intervening in the raw material to be transformed; that is, on reducing the concentration of sugar in the must using filtration techniques or also on wine dealcoholizing by physical processes. These techniques are intended to offer solutions and respond to new consumer expectations, but they may be considered too artificial to be widely accepted. In this way, viticultural strategies may offer a natural solution to obtain grapes with low sugar content, maximizing their quality by delaying ripening. This post is a summary of a recent mini review surveys the viticultural strategies that can be applied in the establishment of a vineyard – that is, when it comes to planting of a new vineyard – such as vineyard altitude, latitude, orientation, and slope, as well as rootstock, variety, clone, training system, and row orientation and slope, with the aim to mitigate the negative effects of climate change on grape and wine quality and to delay grape maturation.

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Screening assay for monitoring of fenhexamid residues on peel of wine grapes: When to properly start harvesting in vineyards?

Growing vines cannot do without the necessary protection against fungal diseases. The most important vine fungal diseases are downy mildew, powdery mildew and gray mold. Most fungicides leave detectable residues on wine grapes and, for safety reasons, have a restriction on when the last spray can be applied prior to harvest. Moreover, yeasts can be killed or inhibited by fungicide residues, leading to so-called “stuck” fermentations. This post report the results of determination of the time when to properly start harvesting by a rinsed screening voltammetric method developed as an electrochemical assay for monitoring the content of fungicide fenhexamid (FNX) on peel of wine grapes.

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Polyphenols in Wine Authenticity

Polyphenols are a diverse group of compounds of utter importance to wine quality. Current understanding of the polyphenolic composition in wine is well elaborated, however, recent studies continuously report novel findings involving them. It is evident that synergistic approaches between emerging analytical platforms in combination with advanced multivariate data analysis will be considered the spearheads toward fraud detection and the provision of authentic wines.

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Coupling DAD and FLD for multiclass profiling of phenolic compounds in wine industry products

This post describes a tandem absorbance and fluorescence detection following liquid chromatography (LC-DAD-FLD) method for the determination of 32 phenolic compounds (PCs) in winemaking industry derived products. The applicability of the method was verified by the suitable quantification of analytes in complex samples of wine, bunch stem and grape cane extracts. The developed LC-DAD-FLD approach is highly recommended for processing large sets of samples in routine quality control of extracts or during characterization studies.

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Is the “Pied de Cuve” a credible alternative to manage indigenous alcoholic fermentation?

Winemakers are increasingly keen to limit the use of commercial yeasts in order to reduce oenological inputs. The preparation of an indigenous winery-made fermentation starter from grapes called ‘pied de cuve’ (PdC) is becoming popular, especially in organic farming systems. However, the implementation of the PdC method is still empirical and knowledge is lacking regarding the impact of PdC on S. cerevisiae diversity during alcoholic fermentation. This post reports the results where the impact of PdC on S. cerevisiae genetic diversity and wine composition was evaluated at an industrial scale.

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A study of regionality in Australian Pinot noir wines demonstrates that NMR and ICP-MS could be used to detect wine fraud

Wine quality and character are defined in part by the terroir in which the grapes are grown. Metabolomic techniques, such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), are used to characterise wines and to detect wine fraud in other countries but have not been extensively trialled in Australia. This post describes the results of a study where ICP-MS and NMR were used to characterise a selection of Pinot noir wines.

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Wine consumption and intestinal health

Does wine consumption favourably modify the composition of the faecal water and, therefore, reduce its potential toxicity against colon cells? Yes, moderate red wine consumption might modify the luminal metabolite content in such a way that it resulted in lower “faecal water cytotoxicity”, a parameter indicative of improved intestinal heath.

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