Viticulture and the European Union’s Common Agricultural Policy (CAP): Historical overview, current situation and future perspective

The paper emphasizes the importance of disseminating agroecological knowledge and implementing nature-based strategies to ensure the successful application of the CAP reforms. It calls for a collective awareness and effort from all societal sectors, including producers, consumers, and policymakers, to embrace environmental protection measures in agriculture. The paper also stresses the need to communicate effectively the benefits of biodiversity conservation and natural soil processes to accelerate the adaptation of agricultural systems to environmental challenges.

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Enhancing employee wellbeing and happiness management in the wine industry

This research examines the connection between Green Human Resource Management (GHRM) and Sustainable Performance (SP) in Spanish wineries, emphasizing the mediating roles of Employee Wellbeing (EW) and Work Engagement (WE). This study is pertinent, given the growing focus on sustainability as a core business strategy. To refine the precision of the examined cause-effect relationships, variables such as the age and size of the winery and membership in a Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) are incorporated as controls. Utilizing a conceptual model informed by prior studies, this study employs structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) to analyze data from 196 wineries collected from September 2022 to January 2023. The findings highlight a positive and significant link between GHRM practices and the SP of these wineries, with EW and WE serving as partial mediators. The significance of this study lies in its contribution to the understanding of GHRM’s benefits in enhancing SP, particularly in the Spanish wine industry, a context not extensively explored in previous research. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the mediating effects of EW and WE on the GHRM-SP relationship in this sector, marking a notable advancement in this field.

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Impact on wine sales of removing the largest serving size by the glass

Alcohol consumption is a major contributor to global morbidity and mortality, necessitating public health interventions. This study, approved by the University of Cambridge, explored the impact of reducing wine serving sizes in licensed premises in England. Employing an A-B-A treatment reversal design, the study involved 21 establishments over twelve weeks, alternating between standard and reduced wine serving sizes. The intervention involved removing the largest serving size of wine glasses, and its effects were measured in terms of wine and beverage sales and total revenue. The findings indicated a 7.6% reduction in wine sales volume without affecting the sales of other beverages or overall revenue, suggesting that smaller serving sizes may effectively reduce alcohol consumption. This approach did not lead to an increase in consumption of other alcoholic beverages or changes in revenue, indicating its potential as a public health strategy. The study’s limitations include its focus on wine sales and its limited generalizability due to the specific context and premises involved. Nonetheless, these findings suggest that reducing serving sizes in alcohol sales could be a promising intervention for public health, meriting further research and consideration in policy-making.

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Incorporation of wine industry waste into red ceramic: study of physical and mechanical properties

Ever wondered about the utilisation of valuable remnants from the wine industry to revolutionise ceramics? A groundbreaking study published recently has opened the door to a new era in ceramic production, exploring the wine industry surplus in an unexpected and astonishing way! In this exciting study, researchers investigated the potential of incorporating grape skins into red ceramics to assess their impact on the physical and mechanical properties of the clayey body. Five different compositions were prepared, each with varying percentages of biomass incorporation:0, 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10%. The specimens, crafted through vacuum extrusion in a laboratory extruder, were subjected to meticulous tests and analyses encompassing chemical, mineralogical, thermal, physical, morphological, and microscopic examinations of the clayey raw materials. This innovative approach not only contributes to sustainable practices by recycling wine industry by-products but also holds the promise of reshaping the future of ceramic production. By harnessing the potential of grape skins, we are not just creating ceramics; we are crafting greener, more sustainable tomorrow. Cheers to a future where the art of winemaking and ceramic craftsmanship intertwine, paving the way for a more eco-friendly and innovative world.

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The role of novel instruments of brand communication and brand image in building consumers’ brand preference and intention to visit wineries

A recent study suggests implications for theory and practice relative to brand management in terms of communication and image; and it proposes insights into novel communication tools and marketing activities for the winery tourism industry. Firms should employ a holistic evaluation of brand communication to involve the whole organization, which would enhance the strategic role that brand communication plays.

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Is there a mutual methodology among Life Cycle Assessment studies in the wine supply chain?

When talking about environmental and sustainability topics, the wine sector plays a fundamental role ensuring that wine remains not only economically but also environmentally sustainable, hence the importance of conducting analyses to measure the impact of food production through Life Cycle Assessment tool.

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The wine industry by-products: applications for food industry and health benefits

Each year, 20 million tons of wine by-products are generated, corresponding to 30% of the total quantity of vinified grapes. Wine by-products are a source of healthy bioactive molecules, such as polyphenols and other molecules (pigments, fibers, minerals, etc.). The abundance of bioactive compounds assures a promising future for nutritional foodstuff production. Wine by-products can be used to fortify aromatized waters and infusions, bread, pasta, dairy products, alcohol, sugary beverages, and processed foods. These innovative products are part of the Mediterranean Diet and are of great interest to both human and environmental health. Read more that http://science-and-wine.com/

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Economic and environmental sustainability of wine packaging systems

The main aim of the study summarized in this post was to perform a combined life cycle assessment and life cycle costing of the most used wine packaging systems in Italy. Packaging plays a key role in food and beverage production and supply chain, but the increasing volume of packaging used causes many environmental concerns. The wine sector is no exception, especially in Italy that is the largest producer in the world. From both the environmental and economical point of views, aseptic cartons and bag-in-box systems were the most sustainable alternatives, while the glass systems had the worst global performances due to the high weight and consequent huge energy consumption during bottle production. The size of the containers was the key factor that most affected the results both in environmental and economic terms.

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3rd World Science & Wine: Sustainability of wine production and food systems in the Mediterranean region

As promised, we will maintain the organization of the World Congress every two years. The 3rd World Science & Wine Congress will be from 14 to 16 June 2023 in Vila Nova De Gaia and the Douro region. The topic for this scientific meeting here will be “Sustainability of wine production and food systems in the Mediterranean region”.

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Breadstick fortification with red grape pomace: effect on nutritional, technological and sensory properties

Grape pomace, a wine-making by-product rich in dietary fiber and total phenolic compounds, is a potential functional ingredient in the fortification of baked goods. Grape pomace improved the nutritional values of fortified breadsticks and changed the rheology of dough and breadsticks’technological properties without affecting sensory acceptability.

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