Management practices, and not surrounding habitats, drive bird and arthropod biodiversity within vineyards

This post is about a paper that concluded that individual management practices are more influential on vineyard biodiversity than the habitat context, overall management regime, or certification status. This study recommends that sustainability accreditation schemes focus on reducing the ecotoxicity of agrochemicals used and encourage the promotion of higher ground vegetation cover by reducing herbicide use to benefit vineyard biodiversity.

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Underrated aspects of a true Mediterranean diet: understanding traditional features for worldwide application of a “Planeterranean” diet

This study explored the multifaceted nature of the Mediterranean diet, beyond its commonly recognized health benefits. It argues that traditional assessment methods focusing on specific food items and dietary scores fail to capture the diet’s cultural, environmental, and lifestyle dimensions. The paper emphasizes the holistic essence of diet, deeply embedded in the history and traditions of the Mediterranean people, which includes a diverse array of foods, social dining practices, and sustainable local agricultural methods. This paper suggests that future research should integrate these underrated aspects, considering the diet’s broader cultural and lifestyle context, to truly understand its impact on health and well-being. This comprehensive approach would allow for the application of a ” planeterranean ” diet globally, promoting not only nutritional health but also environmental and social well-being.

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Effects of post-fermentation addition of green tea extract for sulfur dioxide replacement on Sauvignon Blanc wine phenolic composition, antioxidant capacity, colour, and mouthfeel attributes

This study emphasises the potential of green tea extract as a prospective preservative in winemaking, which is capable of improving the phenolic content and antioxidant capacity of wine while preserving its sensory characteristics. However, additional research is necessary to thoroughly understand the long-term consequences of using green tea extracts in winemaking, including their impact on wine aroma, flavour, and aging characteristics.

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Importance of phenolic compounds in virgin olive oil in cancer treatment

Cancer remains a major health challenge worldwide, with natural compounds offering promising avenues for treatment and prevention. Specifically, olive oil-derived compounds such as oleuropein (OLE) and hydroxytyrosol (HT) are being investigated for their health benefits. These natural products, with a focus on compounds from the Mediterranean Diet, show potential as complementary therapies alongside conventional cancer treatments due to their accessibility and reduced toxicity.

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Olive Oil and Brain Health: Neuroprotection and Cognitive Function

The special issue titled “Olive Oil and Brain Health: Neuroprotection and Cognitive Function” is focused on exploring the relationship between olive oil consumption and brain health. The issue will feature a variety of research, reviews, and short communications that delve into how olive oil, a key component of the Mediterranean diet known for its monounsaturated fats and bioactive compounds, might play a role in preventing neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and enhancing cognitive functions

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Association of plant-based dietary patterns with the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus using cross-sectional results from RaNCD cohort

This study examines the relationship between plant-based diets and the risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). Using data from the Ravansar Non-Communicable Disease cohort, it included 7,100 Kurdish participants, after excluding those with certain health conditions and dietary extremes. The research assessed the association between a Plant-Based Diet Index (PDI) and T2DM incidence, using a food frequency questionnaire to evaluate participants’ diets.

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Attitudes towards natural wines among Spanish winemakers: Relationship with environmental awareness

this research pioneers in revealing the complex interplay of ecological awareness, sensory perceptions, and market understanding in shaping Spanish winemakers’ attitudes towards NWs. It underscores the need for further research to bridge the gap in consumer and producer perceptions and to address the current asymmetry of information in the wine market. The study’s limitations include its reliance on convenience sampling, suggesting a need for more comprehensive future research designs.

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Application of white wine lees for promoting lactic acid bacteria growth and malolactic fermentation in wine

This study explored the potential of utilising white wine lees, a by-product of winemaking, in the industrial application of wine production. By examining the growth of wine lactic acid bacteria and their impact on the malolactic fermentation process, this study highlights the potential of using wine lees as a beneficial agent for MLF in red wines. The study also confirmed that the inclusion of white wine lees does not negatively impact the quality of wine and does not encourage the growth of spoilage microorganisms. Overall, this study proposes a sustainable recycling strategy for wine by-products in winemaking.

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The Impact of the Mediterranean Diet and Lifestyle Intervention among Metabolic Syndrome Patients: Findings of a Randomized Controlled Trial

This post is about a paper that examined the effects of a Mediterranean diet with calorie reduction and physical activity on the lipoprotein profiles of patients with metabolic syndrome. It was a randomized trial involving 202 participants, comparing diet and activity intervention with a control group on a standard Mediterranean diet. This study found significant improvements in weight, BMI, waist circumference, and lipid profiles in the intervention group. These changes suggest potential cardiovascular benefits, and highlight the importance of diet and exercise in managing metabolic syndrome.

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Impact on wine sales of removing the largest serving size by the glass

Alcohol consumption is a major contributor to global morbidity and mortality, necessitating public health interventions. This study, approved by the University of Cambridge, explored the impact of reducing wine serving sizes in licensed premises in England. Employing an A-B-A treatment reversal design, the study involved 21 establishments over twelve weeks, alternating between standard and reduced wine serving sizes. The intervention involved removing the largest serving size of wine glasses, and its effects were measured in terms of wine and beverage sales and total revenue. The findings indicated a 7.6% reduction in wine sales volume without affecting the sales of other beverages or overall revenue, suggesting that smaller serving sizes may effectively reduce alcohol consumption. This approach did not lead to an increase in consumption of other alcoholic beverages or changes in revenue, indicating its potential as a public health strategy. The study’s limitations include its focus on wine sales and its limited generalizability due to the specific context and premises involved. Nonetheless, these findings suggest that reducing serving sizes in alcohol sales could be a promising intervention for public health, meriting further research and consideration in policy-making.

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